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Rehabilitation

Koopoolang pond, was a sump pond from 1966 when the school was built. It received all of the run off water from the school’s rooves, paths and drains. All sorts of things ended up down there; from rubbish to very dangerous cleaning chemicals used by the school cleaners. All of this left the ‘drain’ clogged with pollution, rubbish, and just about anything imaginable. This was, of course, until the rehabilitation programme was started up by the school and its students in 1999.

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Koopoolang means ‘many frogs’ in Nooghar language

Work started on Koopoolang Pond in 1998/99 and has continued ever since. Teachers and students worked together to clean up the pond, extend and deepen it and make it fit for a natural habitat; this took long, constant work and still continues today. Now we are working on making sure it is fit for a breeding programme of the Western Pygmy Perch and the Western Minnow.

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Koopoolang Pond was extended and deepened in January 2004.

Sedges are clumps of reeds and water plants that grow on the banks and shallows of the water body. These allow the Western Pygmy Perch to take refuge in whilst hiding from predators; they will also find a lot of their main diet in these sedge clumps. These plants also help to maintain the stability of the banks, stopping erosion. Sedges also take nutrients out of the water which is essential for the water life.

Surrounding bushland is very important to what happens in the water. The natural environment provides a home for macro-invertebrates, which are a major source of food for creatures out of, as well as in, the water. The bushland also provides reinforcements of the water body banks, preventing erosion. Falling debris, such as tree trunks that land and sit in the water, break down and provide nutrients as well as a hide away for water dwelling creatures.

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Students begin the bank stabilization around all areas of Koopoolang Pond, 2004.

 

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Rehabilitation Work during 2004 included making steps, paths, planting wetland sedges and trees.

 

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Some areas of the banks had to be stabilized with retaining walls. The students pre constructed these in the Environmental Centre and then fitted them into place. This overcame the problem of having no power at the pond.

 

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Many plants were provide from the Leschenault Community Nursery, Bunbury. The school CALM Cadets helped out by building the steps.

 

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A developing pond ecology in May, 2005 so we began to release the fish into this pond.

 

 

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nuary 2004